Subscribe to our Shop TEOT newsletter
Subscribe to receive TEOT blog posts via email
Email Address

Renovation

The Southern Pines North Carolina Home Renovation scene is a booming one. Having seen steady population growth of over 18% since 2010, many newcomers and life-long residents alike look to the stunning architectural integrity of the early century homes built near the railroad tracks of the town’s center. This interest paves the way for successful renovation projects like The Indiana House, the Grout Cottage, Mt. Vernon House and more, all managed and designed by Sarah Farrell of The Estate of Things.

Sarah’s passion for architectural renovation and interior design has manifested through her work with Beaver Path Properties. She has shared the process of each of those projects with you guys here.

The projects that Sarah has brought to life here on The Estate of Things have captured the hearts of renovation junkies online. Sift through the chronicle of these projects below.

A-Frame Project: Windows Are In

After long last, the windows arrived. The front windows from Jeldwen caused the delay. They took what felt like two months to come in, while the other windows had all arrived and were waiting for installation.

And we got our side entry in place with an overhang to shield someone from the elements while they are unlocking the door. 

We added a square window on the right wall of the living area to shed light on that side and at that level. The size of the window in the kitchen was increased and changed from a small rectangular sliding window to a square, fixed window that has black grids and frame on the exterior.

Great turnout with the window in the new, larger stairwell. I would’ve liked for the window to have been a bit taller and my design plan called for a larger window but I was talked out of it somehow but those windows took so long to arrive, I can’t remember why.

A bookcase is going in that space under the stairs that will be re-configured soon. The addition of a small pantry cabinet behind the bookcase will provide another space for kitchen storage or for whatever the homeowner chooses to store there.

A new view of the trees and more light in the master bedroom.

share

A-Frame Project: Kitchen Inspiration

My main inspiration for the A-frame kitchen design is the next three images of the same kitchen taken at different distances or angles. Like this kitchen, we need a lot of open shelving.

We need open shelving especially in the A-frame kitchen because it is a smaller kitchen space and we want to maintain an open and modern feel in the space. So we’re going with no upper cabinets and just floating shelving.

A close up of shelves turning the corner with square tiles installed in a brick pattern. The plan (this week, subject to change) in the a-frame kitchen is to have the shelves wrap the corner to the sink window.

I liked this island style a lot. Its a bit different from usual kitchen island fare and it has storage and a place for a couple of stools. We need both of those things in this space. Also, I particularly like the decision to make the shelving out of stained wood. A lot of these painted wood surfaces can get scratched up sometimes especially in the kitchen where you might be sliding bowls or fruit baskets or whatever around, the stained wood has a durable finish.

I’m really liking this subtle off white but still modern subway tile on the backsplash, our main kitchen inspiration also had an off-white tile that has an alabaster quality, it makes things less stark. The focus of this image for me, is the tall cabinet that may or may not be next to our refrigerator. Trying to figure out if there is a cabinet next to the fridge or if we’re just building in the fridge with panels.

We’re so close to finalizing the kitchen plan. It’s time now to do the leg work on finding the right person to fabricate the shelves and I’m really leaning toward ordering from the same company that built the shelves at TEOT’s former shop space. I know how much people loved them because I heard at least once a day.

share

A-Frame Project: Week 4

We spent a good week or so planning and ordering the windows for the front of the house, new windows for the living/kitchen and windows for the dormer.

Without making the whole entire front glass, we wanted to expand the view of the lake from the living, dining and kitchen areas so we needed to add windows. We expanded the existing french doors with a new, nicer pair of doors with full view windows on each side.

For the top, we had two different design ideas in mind to enlarge the windows. The first concept was something like the image below, where the two end windows each had clipped corners to accommodate the a-frame.

The second design was a larger set of windows that followed the triangular line of the roof with the tallest window being in the center of three, similar to this,

I was a strong proponent of design #1 for some time but after discussion I saw the merits of design #2 because it was a melding of modern and a little lake cottage so… we went with design #2.

We added two new windows, one square window in the living area and a larger square kitchen window over the sink to replace this one,

For the stairwell portion of the new dormer we settled on a window design like this scaled down to fit our space. For this project we did choose black frames on the exterior with white frames on the interior.

To the right of this window on the same dormer is the master bedroom.

Because the bed would be placed in this dormer, we wanted to add a modern, short rectangular window for the bed to slide right underneath. We used some of these images as inspiration to help us work out size and shape.

With our wrapping rectangular window we hope to bring in more light and have a pretty green forest view from the master.

Once the windows were ordered it was time to start preparing for the new roof. Roofing material choice is black metal.

share

A Frame Project: Week 2 and 3

When we first started on this project in late spring we encountered some routine rain fall that sent the crew home for almost an entire week but after the rain stopped we got back to it.

Here’s what happened in week two…not much. Well actually, the dog house entry over the red door is gone!

That’s why we combined weeks two and three, so you could see some action.

We started and framed the dormer that will expand the head room for our stairwell and create a much larger space to put a bed in the master bedroom. We decided on one large dormer to achieve both objectives instead of framing two separate dormers.

You can see the beginnings of what the dormer might add to the interior. You can also see our brainstorming scribbles of a built-in bookshelf on the staircase wall.

This view shows how the dormer relates to the existing shed roof of the laundry room. The dormer lands right above that existing roof.

It’s time to take a deep dive in to window design and configuration next week so be ready to pour over images of the windows of modern homes.

 

 

 

 

share

A Frame Project: Week 1

We kicked off the A-frame renovation in Week 1. We had our own #demoday and we removed the tan vinyl siding and vinyl trim from the house and uncovered a strange little add-on cavity underneath the vinyl at the end of the “A” on the left front side. It was a strange and unnecessary design flaw that we promptly removed. After removing that we found that the leg of the “A” on the left side was then shorter than the right. So we’ll fix that soon enough.

Just for fun, here’s a refresher of what she looked like when we purchased.

There is a lot of discussion about changing the window and door configuration on the front of the house and we’ve all agreed that would be best to expand the view and improve the design. We’re adding windows up top and there will now be four doors with two of them being fixed.

We uncovered T-111 heavy textured siding that was popular in the 70s and 80s. I can’t say that I’m a fan. It was an affordable siding option back then, a material that kind of mimicked board and batten and barn wood at the same time.

In week 1, we also started the processing of pruning and trimming and clearing built up yard debris. It’s a process that will continue.

This awkward design that is the covered entry on the side will disappear next week. We’re looking forward to exposing the chimney and making it more of a standout as an architectural element.

After some demo, it was an obvious and simple task to rebuild the deck. The existing deck was compromised structurally and long past it’s prime.

Not a bad start at all! Check back soon for more progress at the A-Frame Renovation.

share

A-Frame Project: Inspiration

In case you missed the intro, this is the A-frame project. Click here, to go back and read the beginning post.

We’ve been scouring the web, looking for images of the right dormer examples for the A-frame and I think we collected some good ones. Here are some other images that are providing inspiration for our A-frame renovation.

 

We know we want cable railing or a metal element in our railing on the front deck. But we’re on the fence as to whether or not we use metal conduit, or galvanized pipe or spring for a Feeney cable railing system.

 

this exterior is a huge source of inspiration and we’ve ordered black windows

 

we thought about using a “dog-eared” window on the front like below but we ultimately decided we didn’t like the corners,

 

 

there’s a lot of angled storage opportunities in an a-frame

Color picks for the exterior will be on the darker side. This Benjamin Moore color, Brewster Grey is an interesting color. I recommended this for a master vanity color and it worked fabulously!

I like this combination a lot, interested in the way they chose to trim the windows in white. I also really like that rich teal color. Our doors and windows are black.

You can check out the rest of what I’m pinning for the A-frame project here.

share